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Chip

Removing the Crossover board from the enclosure

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How does one remove the crossover board from the enclosure? Many of the photos show it in a stand alone mode indicating it has been removed from the enclosure structure. I don't want to break the board, it appears to be a sort of masonite. I am sure I can replace it with 1/4 inch ply if necessary but would rather retain the original.

I have a couple of AR2axs, serial numbers 269000 and 269001, personally acquired my me in the Kunsan Air Base Exchange in early 1975. Since then they have been shipped all over the place along with my many military moves. Now it is time to replace the capacitors in the crossovers and refoam the woofers. The Sansui amp finally died, developed a 60 cycle hum, it is either a coupling capacitor or a filter electrolytic but beyond what I want to tackle to repair. I acquired a Pioneer SX-750 to replace the Sansui.

My wife wants to refinish the outside of the enclosures, they appear to be Teak veneer. She wants to stain them a darker color to match the sideboard upon which the 52 inch Sony Barvo sits. I have to admit, it needs to sort of match. And the outside color does not effect the performance of the AR2axs.

Cheers,

Chip

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How does one remove the crossover board from the enclosure? Many of the photos show it in a stand alone mode indicating it has been removed from the enclosure structure. I don't want to break the board, it appears to be a sort of masonite. I am sure I can replace it with 1/4 inch ply if necessary but would rather retain the original.

Chip:

There is no need to remove the crossover boards. They are hot glued and gun stapled to the cabinet backside. If they were destroyed on arrival, then one would use tempered Masonite, but if so, would need to restore lettering visible from exterior. Best to keep original.

Simply perform all re-wiring and component replacement through the woofer opening. The AR-3a restoration manual (in AR section of library) describes techniques that apply to many facets of restoring other early AR models.

My wife wants to refinish the outside of the enclosures, they appear to be Teak veneer. She wants to stain them a darker color to match the sideboard upon which the 52 inch Sony Barvo sits. I have to admit, it needs to sort of match. And the outside color does not effect the performance of the AR2axs.

Chip

AR finishes were usually oil stained and pehaps (?) over coated with clear lacquer on some versions. Additionally, what "accidents" did your cabinet surfaces befall? Attempting to remove the original finish on an old, thin venier may not result in a surface that will take, uniformly, a darker oil stain. You might not be happy with the result. We do not feel that all pieces of furniture in a room have to be the same color, just that their styles blend.

Cheers and good luck!

John

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Chip:

There is no need to remove the crossover boards. They are hot glued and gun stapled to the cabinet backside. If they were destroyed on arrival, then one would use tempered Masonite, but if so, would need to restore lettering visible from exterior. Best to keep original.

Simply perform all re-wiring and component replacement through the woofer opening. The AR-3a restoration manual (in AR section of library) describes techniques that apply to many facets of restoring other early AR models.

AR finishes were usually oil stained and pehaps (?) over coated with clear lacquer on some versions. Additionally, what "accidents" did your cabinet surfaces befall? Attempting to remove the original finish on an old, thin venier may not result in a surface that will take, uniformly, a darker oil stain. You might not be happy with the result. We do not feel that all pieces of furniture in a room have to be the same color, just that their styles blend.

Cheers and good luck!

John

Thanks for the reply. I will leave the crossover board in place and do the wiring from the Woofer location. It will be a reach in the AR2ax enclosure, as the crossover is behind the tweeters, not behind the woofer. But I can do it.

Regarding refinishing. I do not care a wit about the color, but my wife does and she has an exceptional decorator's eye. So it is a small thing to let her do as she wishes. The veneer has not had any oil for 30 some odd years, I am sure a good wash and they will take a good stain on very easily. She has done other stuff, wood stuff with great skill and it looks good. With dark beams and dark wood in abound, the Teak coloration just does not match, in fact sticks out like a sore thumb. And like I said, it does not effect the sound quality at all.

Again thanks. Might run a bead of hot glue around the crossover boards to make sure they are sealed up good.

Chip

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Hi Chip

A couple of comments:

First, I have seen John's woodworking and can tell you that his advice will always be first rate--both with regard to the woodworking and the electronics (he edited the excellent AR3a restoration booklet).

Second--it is not at all difficult to reach the 2ax crossovers through the woofer opening. I have restored/recapped 2 pair and it is not a problem. Although this makes me think 2nd thoughts--maybe you have the European version? In the US version the xo is behind the woofer as shown in the photo. Do you have the ones with the very thin euro-style front frame? Maybe the xo placement in those is different.

Third (and maybe fourth) If the cabinets are indeed teak you may want to consider refinishing them in teak, since that finish was relatively rare. BUT--if you do decide to go darker, I have had excellent results with Howard's Restor-a-Finish.

http://www.howardproducts.com/restora.htm

It comes in a variety of colors including Walnut, Dark Walnut, Even Ebony Brown and is available at Home Depot (or Lowes--I forget), Ace Hardware and several online retailers:

http://www.howardproducts.com/links.asp

You apply it with fine steel wool and it evens out the old finish, colors it, and makes it look pretty much like new. You can NOT apply polyurethane over it, but you CAN apply Watco Oil (also available tinted) or Minwax Antique oil (for a bit of a sheen) or Tung Oil (ditto).

http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=46

Good luck.

Kent

post-101828-1280700533.jpg

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Hi Chip

A couple of comments:

First, I have seen John's woodworking and can tell you that his advice will always be first rate--both with regard to the woodworking and the electronics (he edited the excellent AR3a restoration booklet).

Second--it is not at all difficult to reach the 2ax crossovers through the woofer opening. I have restored/recapped 2 pair and it is not a problem. Although this makes me think 2nd thoughts--maybe you have the European version? In the US version the xo is behind the woofer as shown in the photo.

http://www.howardproducts.com/restora.htm

My camera batteries are dead, recharging as I write. Not European, acquired from USAF BX in Korea; very American. Perhaps they are oiled Walnut. Yet, will refinish a dark color to please my wife of 49 years (well 49 years on 9 Sep 2010).

I have opened up the enclosure via the woofer. I removed the old caps and awaiting new ones. Cleaned off the crossover board, had to use a chisel to clean up under the old boxed caps. The woofer was connected via spade clips so it is all the way out of the box. Bagged the yellow fiber glass. Pulled the bail on one rheostat, is was pristine, no corrosion or rust anywhere. So left the other one alone, too much trouble getting the bail back on. Put a dab of dielectric grease (the stuff one used use on points, little tube of it in my possession for yea last 15 or so years) on the wiper. It was a b - - - h to the get bail back on; after a bucket of sweat I got it back together.

Removed the remnants of the old foam seal. It was totally shot. Will clean up metal basket with alcohol, cleaned alot of it with an Xacto knife. Torn on what glue to use. I have Elmers, Tightbond II and Aileens Tacky glue all available. Cone is in great shape. Not sure to coat the foam's inner seal or coat the cone with glue. I suppose either way will work. Will go over the cone edge with alcohol too. Please advise.

Chip

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Chip

It would be less confusing (to me) if you keep all of your discussion of this restoration on a single thread. Anyway, as I mentioned on the other thread, these instructions will show everything you need to know:

http://www.citlink.net/~msound/refoam/

And welcome to CSP!

Be sure to read the AR3a restoration booklet. Much of it is applicable to the 2ax:

http://www.classicspeakerpages.net/library...-3a_full_pd.pdf

Kent

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Chip

It would be less confusing (to me) if you keep all of your discussion of this restoration on a single thread. Anyway, as I mentioned on the other thread, these instructions will show everything you need to know:

And welcome to CSP!

Be sure to read the AR3a restoration booklet. Much of it is applicable to the 2ax:

Kent

Kent, I have read the AR3 Restoration several times. I open new threads so that others searching for that topic can find it, otherwise, it just comes as say AR2ax restoration which is so general as may not answer a specific question. Thank you for your responses.

Chip

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I have received capacitors from Parts Express, pricey service, but they arrived in record time. I have glued the two capacitors to the crossover board using "Goop". That seems to be working well. Next is the soldering operation and judicial use of shrink spaghetti to spruce up the looks (of course no one but me will know what it looks like). I am thinking I will leave a copy of the schematic inside the enclosure so that the next person will not have to do a search to find it. The next time for me will be when I am 80 and some how or other, I don't think I will be around, or if I am, not caring too much about it. But right now I am enjoying the process.

Chip

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