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Found 2 results

  1. Quite an "interesting" opinion by someone called Herb Reichert as part of a review of the Harbeth Monitor 30.2 40th Anniversary Edition loudspeaker over at Stereophile. https://www.stereophile.com/content/harbeth-monitor-302-40th-anniversary-edition-loudspeaker "Everything sounds like what it's made of. I'm known for saying that, and to me, it's obvious: box speakers with dome tweeters sound like box speakers with dome tweeters. I can hear their tweeters calling to me when I'm in the next room, making a phone call. I can hear their boxes hissing and groaning even after I turn off the stereo. Many a day, I think Edgar Villchur, inventor of the acoustic-suspension loudspeaker and the dome tweeter, ruined audio, and that audiophiles will never stop denying how artificially colored the sounds of domes and cones in boxes really are." What say you? As far as I'm concerned the guy is a bullsh*t artist.
  2. Edgar Villchur: American Inventor, Educator and Writer Miriam Villchur Berg, daughter of the late Edgar Villchur, has assembled two excellent historical websites about her famous dad: edgarvillchur.com and her blog, villchurblog.com. There is a great deal of wonderful Villchur information in these websites, correcting many historical inaccuracies in the Wikipedia website (which I am going to correct soon). Aside from Roy Allison's excellent article, "A Glorious Time," the "best" article is my little tribute to Edgar Villchur: http://edgarvillchur.com/a-tribute/ —Tom Tyson
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